Victory! Commissioner Confirms That EU Cosmetics Testing Ban Will Go Ahead

Posted by 2 years ago | Permalink | Comments (92)

We’ve just sent the European Commission a huge bouquet of flowers. Why? Because we’re delighted by the fantastic news that a ban on the sale of all animal-tested cosmetics in the EU will come into effect in March of this year.

The much-needed ban has been in the pipeline for a long time, but there were fears that it might be postponed or weakened. This week, PETA UK Associate Director Mimi Bekhechi met Commissioner Tonio Borg in person and got his word that it will go ahead, meaning that, starting in March, cosmetics companies that subject animals to horrific tests will not be allowed to sell their products on European shelves.

This landmark success comes after thousands of you joined us and our international affiliates in taking action, with public protests, phone calls and a deluge of e-mails to the Commission. We’d like to say a huge “Thank you!” to all of you who joined this campaign and showed the EU that, across Europe, people are united in the belief that cosmetics cannot come before animals’ lives. The ban will save hundreds of thousands of animals and follows a similar ban implemented by Israel in January.

This is a great day for animals and consumers! Please join us in thanking Commissioner Borg for making the EU a more compassionate place – send him flowers or a card at this address:

Mr. Tonio BORG
Directorate-General Health and Consumer Policy
European Commission
B-1049 Brussels BELGIUM

Comments

  • Margaret Jones commented on February 1, 2013 at 3:36 pm

    Great to hear this xxxxx

    • Anne Jenkins commented on February 9, 2013 at 12:05 am

      Can you please confirm that the ban affects ALL animal tested products. I have heard and read that it only affects NEW products meaning that all the original products will still be on sale and manufactured using animal tests. I realise that companies rely on new products to increase consumer spending and that over a period of time the ban will eventually affect all products but need to have this clarified. I would love to see existing products by manufacturers such as L’Oreal and Max Factor cleared off all shop shelves! Thank you.

  • Elizabeth Drayton commented on February 1, 2013 at 3:46 pm

    Thank you

  • lesley Roberts commented on February 1, 2013 at 3:56 pm

    Wow this is wonderful news what a break though for our furry friends who have such a terrible time on this planet Thank you so much

  • Tanya commented on February 1, 2013 at 4:13 pm

    Such amazing news; I actually have tears in my eyes. Onwards and upwards. 😀

  • Lesley commented on February 1, 2013 at 4:35 pm

    This is a wonderful break through! Thank you SO much!

  • carole orr commented on February 1, 2013 at 4:50 pm

    Fabulous news! Thanks for your help in this

  • Mary Quatela commented on February 1, 2013 at 5:10 pm

    Thank you so much!

  • Anthony Dacko commented on February 1, 2013 at 6:25 pm

    Excellent news the sooner it is in place the better.

  • Alix Freeman commented on February 1, 2013 at 6:30 pm

    I am delighted!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11

  • Corrie Foster commented on February 1, 2013 at 6:31 pm

    Great news!!!

  • Jackie commented on February 1, 2013 at 7:45 pm

    So pleased to hear so much suffering will be spared :-)

  • Elaine thonas commented on February 1, 2013 at 9:34 pm

    Brilliant news thankyou so much from the bottom of my heart

  • Jean Gilliard commented on February 1, 2013 at 10:14 pm

    Thank you so much.

  • Haleh Nather commented on February 1, 2013 at 10:50 pm

    What a great day for human kind to start being human. I have tears in my eyes too.

  • Lesley illingworth commented on February 2, 2013 at 12:27 am

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.xxxxxxxxxx

  • Louise peel commented on February 2, 2013 at 5:39 pm

    Fantastic news! It’s amazing what can happen when you work together for a peaceful and compassionate Planet

  • Karen Edwards commented on February 6, 2013 at 9:27 pm

    Wonderful news that couldn’t come soon enough. Thank you to all involved.

  • Eliza Hardy commented on February 8, 2013 at 9:36 pm

    I’m so glad it’ll give me peace of mind when buying cosmetics and I won’t have to constantly read the label. It’s so great the work that PETA do, and by this a few less animals are suffering.

  • hollie marston commented on February 8, 2013 at 9:36 pm

    What a result, well done peta your amazing.

  • rocketgirl commented on February 8, 2013 at 10:37 pm

    wow!!!! Finally! Thank you very much! we must love animals but not killed them!! yahooooo!!!

  • Linda A Gold Levy commented on February 8, 2013 at 10:54 pm

    Wonderful Wonderful news a long awaited victory for animals used in the cosmetic industry, now we wan’t world wide non use live of animals in testing labs

  • Rommy commented on February 8, 2013 at 11:19 pm

    World wide ban on animal testing is needed, this a a fantastic start, PETA you are hero’s.

  • Alicia Santos commented on February 8, 2013 at 11:38 pm

    This are great news, it’s almost dificult to beieve. I’m so happy for all our dear animals.
    Can you inform me if this European Law is written already and what aspects in the labels of the products can asure us that follows the law it self?

  • Anna commented on February 9, 2013 at 6:26 am

    Amazing news, THANK YOU to all who had a part in the this. Lets keep believing and doing what we can to work towards a ban on animal testing for scientific purposes. And also for China to follow suit.

  • Erna van araooyen commented on February 9, 2013 at 7:17 am

    Long live our animals!!!

  • Helen Jamieson commented on February 9, 2013 at 7:23 am

    I am so happy at this news…at last.

  • Sandra Fisher commented on February 9, 2013 at 9:26 am

    My oh my, does this really mean I can walk into a shop and purchase a mascara with no research first, it about time, well done peta and EU’s Tonio Borg, what a star your are. Shine on for others to see, x

  • Luke Klein commented on February 9, 2013 at 10:14 am

    About bloody time! Fantastic news.

  • Karen and Steve commented on February 9, 2013 at 10:25 am

    We are both really glad to hear this news, and the lives it has saved. Wish it could have been sooner though. We done commissioner!

  • Pam Flanagan commented on February 9, 2013 at 11:32 am

    At last!! A breakthrough – long may these campaigns continue until everyone realises that animals are not “ours” to do with as we like but co-inhabitants of this planet who are as deserving of kindness and respect as any of us.

  • coosemans commented on February 9, 2013 at 1:00 pm

    Carine Coosemans a partagé un lien.
    1 février
    REPONSE DE GAIA………………………!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    GAIA
    16:02 (Il y a 1 heure)

    à moi

    Les images ne sont pas affichées. Afficher les images ci-dessous – Toujours afficher les images de info@gaia.be
    Bonjour Carine,

    Merci pour votre courriel.

    Les informations fournies sont exactes, dans la mesure où l’interdiction européenne de la vente de produits cosmétiques testés sur animaux – qui entre bien en application le 11 mars prochain – n’empêchera pas totalement les tests sur animaux imposés par la directive REACH.

    Cette interdiction du 11 mars reste une énorme avancée mais il faut néanmoins tenir compte de la nuance suivante, précisée dans le texte de loi : c’est la finalité principale de l’ingrédient qui détermine s’il “peut” être testé sur des animaux. En clair, si l’ingrédient en question est produit principalement à des fins cosmétiques, il ne pourra pas être testé sur des animaux. Si en revanche son utilité première est de fournir d’autres industries (produits de peinture, par exemple), mais que secondairement il peut également être utilisé en cosmétologie, alors ces tests seront malheureusement toujours autorisés.

    Le consommateur attentif devra donc continuer à se référer à la liste des produits cosmétiques non testés sur animaux s’il désire être certain d’acheter éthique.

    Par ailleurs, la Coalition européenne pour mettre fin à l’expérimentation animale, dont GAIA est membre, continue d’oeuvrer pour empêcher, dès que cela est légalement possible, l’utilisation d’animaux dans le cadre de la directive REACH.

    Cordialement,

    Vincent Bozzolan
    Front Desk Officer

    ——————————
    GAIA asbl / vzw
    27 Galerie Ravenstein / Ravensteingalerij
    1000 Bruxelles / Brussel
    T: 02 / 245 29 50
    F: 02 / 215 09 43
    http://www.gaia.be
    ——————————
    GAIA | voice of the voiceless
    http://www.gaia.be
    J’aime · · Promouvoir · Partager
    Thierry Collart aime ça.

    Carine Coosemans UNE REGLEMENTATION QUI CACHE UNE AUGMENTATION MASSIVE DES TESTS SUR ANIMAUX
    par Je boycotte les produits testés sur les animaux, jeudi 31 janvier 2013, 13:21 ·
    Hier, 30 janiver 2013, je vous ai annoncé la mise en application, à partir du 11 mars 2013, de la réglementation européenne visant à interdire la revente de produits testés sur les animaux (produit fini et ingrédients) en Europe…

    Ne nous laissons pas berner et il est plus important que jamais de n’acheter QUE des marques certifiées non testées sur les animaux !

    Extrait d’un article concernant cette réglemenation…
    Une réglementation qui n’a pas de sens compte tenu du nouveau programme REACH !

    Je cite :
    “L’interdiction des tests sur les animaux pour les ingrédients cosmétiques cache une augmentation massive des tests sur les animaux en Europe.

    Le 15 janvier 2003, la Directive européenne sur les cosmétiques a été modifiée dans le but d’interdire les tests sur les animaux pour les ingrédients cosmétiques.Pour les entreprises, groupes d’action et individus qui s’étaient battus contre les tests sur les animaux, ce fut une victoire significative, célébrée comme telle.

    Cette interdiction a été rendue possible car le public européen a été sensibilisé au contenu des tests endurés par les animaux pour leur maquillage et leurs produits d’hygiène, et ce sont ces consommateurs qui ont exigé que les animaux ne souffrent pas et ne meurent pas pour eux. Il est désormais considéré comme acquis que les tests sur les animaux pour les produits cosmétiques appartiennent au passé, qu’aucune entreprise ne s’y prête plus et qu’ils sont interdits de fait.

    Cela serait largement vrai s’il n’y avait pas un nouveau dispositif législatif européen dénommé REACH (enregistrement, évaluation et autorisation de substances chimiques). Les buts de REACH sont louables : s’assurer que les produits chimiques soient mieux réglementés de manière à ce que ceux qui sont dangereux pour notre santé ou l’environnement soient restreints dans leur usage. Néanmoins, la sûreté des produits chimiques sera déterminée à partir de données récoltées sur les animaux, et si un produit chimique n’a jamais été testé sur les animaux, alors de tels tests devront être menés.

    La grande majorité des 8000 et quelques ingrédients utilisés par les fabricants de cosmétiques vont donc être concernés par REACH. Concrètement, c’est le cas de tout ingrédient ayant subi le moindre « traitement chimique » et l’on trouve actuellement 143000 substances sur la liste. Par exemple, la lavande est exemptée de test mais pas l’huile essentielle de lavande. Et ce sont précisément les ingrédients les plus naturels, généralement ceux que préfèrent utiliser les entreprises opposées aux tests sur les animaux, qui sont le plus susceptibles d’être testés sur les animaux maintenant alors qu’ils ne l’étaient pas auparavant.

    Les tests sur les animaux sont un indicateur peu fiable de la manière dont une substance va réagir sur le corps humain ou l’environnement. En effet, bien souvent les autorités réglementaires qui compilent des données récoltées sur les animaux concluent à l’absence de certitude quant aux résultats obtenus pour une substance étudiée, et demandent à ce que d’autres tests sur animaux soient conduits pour se prononcer. Nous craignons que cela soit le cas avec REACH ; non seulement cela marquera la fin de tous les cosmétiques sans cruauté et la fin du libre choix des consommateurs qui préfèrent ces produits, mais en plus, ces tests étant inappropriés, cela ne conduira pas à mettre sur le marché des produits plus sûrs ni à l’interdiction des substances dangereuses.”

    Source de l’article : http://fr.lush.eu/shop/info/9/animal-testing
    Découvert grâce à Chris Alf Onso

    PLUS QUE JAMAIS BOYCOTTONS LES MARQUES TESTEES SUR LES ANIMAUX

    Comment faire ?? Qui croire ?? je refuse tous les produits et sous produits testés. Jusqu’à présent j’ai toujours fait confiance à votre liste d’informations….mes amis aussi… Respectueusement..Coosemans Carine

    Contre les tests sur les animaux
    fr.lush.eu
    1 février, 17:52 · J’aime · Supprimer l’aperçu

  • coosemans commented on February 9, 2013 at 1:09 pm

    Carine Coosemans a partagé un lien.
    1 février
    REPONSE DE GAIA………………………!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    GAIA
    16:02 (Il y a 1 heure)

    à moi

    Les images ne sont pas affichées. Afficher les images ci-dessous – Toujours afficher les images de info@gaia.be
    Bonjour Carine,

    Merci pour votre courriel.

    Les informations fournies sont exactes, dans la mesure où l’interdiction européenne de la vente de produits cosmétiques testés sur animaux – qui entre bien en application le 11 mars prochain – n’empêchera pas totalement les tests sur animaux imposés par la directive REACH.

    Cette interdiction du 11 mars reste une énorme avancée mais il faut néanmoins tenir compte de la nuance suivante, précisée dans le texte de loi : c’est la finalité principale de l’ingrédient qui détermine s’il “peut” être testé sur des animaux. En clair, si l’ingrédient en question est produit principalement à des fins cosmétiques, il ne pourra pas être testé sur des animaux. Si en revanche son utilité première est de fournir d’autres industries (produits de peinture, par exemple), mais que secondairement il peut également être utilisé en cosmétologie, alors ces tests seront malheureusement toujours autorisés.

    Le consommateur attentif devra donc continuer à se référer à la liste des produits cosmétiques non testés sur animaux s’il désire être certain d’acheter éthique.

    Par ailleurs, la Coalition européenne pour mettre fin à l’expérimentation animale, dont GAIA est membre, continue d’oeuvrer pour empêcher, dès que cela est légalement possible, l’utilisation d’animaux dans le cadre de la directive REACH.

    Cordialement,

    Vincent Bozzolan
    Front Desk Officer

    ——————————
    GAIA asbl / vzw
    27 Galerie Ravenstein / Ravensteingalerij
    1000 Bruxelles / Brussel
    T: 02 / 245 29 50
    F: 02 / 215 09 43
    http://www.gaia.be
    ——————————
    GAIA | voice of the voiceless
    http://www.gaia.be
    J’aime · · Promouvoir · Partager
    Thierry Collart aime ça.

    Carine Coosemans UNE REGLEMENTATION QUI CACHE UNE AUGMENTATION MASSIVE DES TESTS SUR ANIMAUX
    par Je boycotte les produits testés sur les animaux, jeudi 31 janvier 2013, 13:21 ·
    Hier, 30 janiver 2013, je vous ai annoncé la mise en application, à partir du 11 mars 2013, de la réglementation européenne visant à interdire la revente de produits testés sur les animaux (produit fini et ingrédients) en Europe…

    Ne nous laissons pas berner et il est plus important que jamais de n’acheter QUE des marques certifiées non testées sur les animaux !

    Extrait d’un article concernant cette réglemenation…
    Une réglementation qui n’a pas de sens compte tenu du nouveau programme REACH !

    Je cite :
    “L’interdiction des tests sur les animaux pour les ingrédients cosmétiques cache une augmentation massive des tests sur les animaux en Europe.

    Le 15 janvier 2003, la Directive européenne sur les cosmétiques a été modifiée dans le but d’interdire les tests sur les animaux pour les ingrédients cosmétiques.Pour les entreprises, groupes d’action et individus qui s’étaient battus contre les tests sur les animaux, ce fut une victoire significative, célébrée comme telle.

    Cette interdiction a été rendue possible car le public européen a été sensibilisé au contenu des tests endurés par les animaux pour leur maquillage et leurs produits d’hygiène, et ce sont ces consommateurs qui ont exigé que les animaux ne souffrent pas et ne meurent pas pour eux. Il est désormais considéré comme acquis que les tests sur les animaux pour les produits cosmétiques appartiennent au passé, qu’aucune entreprise ne s’y prête plus et qu’ils sont interdits de fait.

    Cela serait largement vrai s’il n’y avait pas un nouveau dispositif législatif européen dénommé REACH (enregistrement, évaluation et autorisation de substances chimiques). Les buts de REACH sont louables : s’assurer que les produits chimiques soient mieux réglementés de manière à ce que ceux qui sont dangereux pour notre santé ou l’environnement soient restreints dans leur usage. Néanmoins, la sûreté des produits chimiques sera déterminée à partir de données récoltées sur les animaux, et si un produit chimique n’a jamais été testé sur les animaux, alors de tels tests devront être menés.

    La grande majorité des 8000 et quelques ingrédients utilisés par les fabricants de cosmétiques vont donc être concernés par REACH. Concrètement, c’est le cas de tout ingrédient ayant subi le moindre « traitement chimique » et l’on trouve actuellement 143000 substances sur la liste. Par exemple, la lavande est exemptée de test mais pas l’huile essentielle de lavande. Et ce sont précisément les ingrédients les plus naturels, généralement ceux que préfèrent utiliser les entreprises opposées aux tests sur les animaux, qui sont le plus susceptibles d’être testés sur les animaux maintenant alors qu’ils ne l’étaient pas auparavant.

    Les tests sur les animaux sont un indicateur peu fiable de la manière dont une substance va réagir sur le corps humain ou l’environnement. En effet, bien souvent les autorités réglementaires qui compilent des données récoltées sur les animaux concluent à l’absence de certitude quant aux résultats obtenus pour une substance étudiée, et demandent à ce que d’autres tests sur animaux soient conduits pour se prononcer. Nous craignons que cela soit le cas avec REACH ; non seulement cela marquera la fin de tous les cosmétiques sans cruauté et la fin du libre choix des consommateurs qui préfèrent ces produits, mais en plus, ces tests étant inappropriés, cela ne conduira pas à mettre sur le marché des produits plus sûrs ni à l’interdiction des substances dangereuses.”

    Source de l’article : http://fr.lush.eu/shop/info/9/animal-testing
    Découvert grâce à Chris Alf Onso

    PLUS QUE JAMAIS BOYCOTTONS LES MARQUES TESTEES SUR LES ANIMAUX

    Comment faire ?? Qui croire ?? je refuse tous les produits et sous produits testés. Jusqu’à présent j’ai toujours fait confiance à votre liste d’informations….mes amis aussi… Respectueusement..Coosemans Carine

    Contre les tests sur les animaux
    fr.lush.eu
    1 février, 17:52 · J’aime · S

  • Liisa Markkanen commented on February 9, 2013 at 1:46 pm

    Fantastic! I have been interested to know when this would go ahead. I am over the moon that animals can actually have a life somewhere Thank you!! xxxxxxxx

  • coosemans commented on February 9, 2013 at 2:32 pm

    je vous demande de faire paraître cette vérité ….Merci

  • coosemans commented on February 9, 2013 at 2:36 pm

    Ne vous réjouissez pas trop vite…… Restez sur vos gardes…

  • Jan Whiteley commented on February 9, 2013 at 2:39 pm

    This is great news and long overdue. Lets have a ban on household products being tested on animals too as soon as possible.

    • coosemans commented on February 9, 2013 at 2:49 pm

      NON NON NON…..il faut tout savoir…

  • Scarlett Carson commented on February 9, 2013 at 3:29 pm

    I have tears in my eyes, I can’t wait to see the changes in the shops! :-)

  • vera dyke commented on February 9, 2013 at 4:03 pm

    Not before time. I do not see any demonstrations the street these days, like in the sixties, are people afraid of getting arrested for their beliefs? and i do not see any organisation promoting this method of making your beliefs known ,are they only interested in making a career for themselves , as public protestes and sending e-mails and sitting in the office waiting for donations is not what you would call being active

  • chander kumar soni commented on February 9, 2013 at 4:52 pm

    thanks.
    god bless you, for this kind action.

  • Tiziana Sala commented on February 9, 2013 at 6:51 pm

    My knowledge of English language is not to well, so I don’t hunderstand many words. Sorry. I shall to send all the requirement for defending animals.

  • Elizabeth Evans commented on February 9, 2013 at 9:58 pm

    Wonderful news. Perhaps they have seen the light and realise that using animals for research is no good

  • SUE GRIFFITHS commented on February 10, 2013 at 12:45 am

    Fantastic news. Now let’s work to have a ban on animal testing for household products. Thank you so much. Each victory gives us the strength to carry on after reading about so much cruelty and abuse.

  • Galina Kostova, Russia commented on February 10, 2013 at 1:35 pm

    Thank all people who made this victory! I am so happy, I really have tears on my eyes!!!!

  • Penny Ryan commented on February 10, 2013 at 5:13 pm

    MY lord this is great, why is the USA so backward…..

  • carine coosemans commented on February 10, 2013 at 5:35 pm

    GAIA asbl
    27 Galerie Ravenstein
    1000 Bruxelles / Brussel
    T: 02 / 245 29 50
    F: 02 / 215 09 43
    http://www.gaia.be

    Provided information is exact, insofar as the European prohibition of the sale of cosmetic products tested on animals – which between good in application next on March 11 – will not completely prevent the tests on animals imposed by directive REACH.

    This prohibition of March 11 remains an enormous projection but it is necessary nevertheless to take account of the following nuance, specified in the text of law: it is the principal purpose of the ingredient which determines if it “can” be tested on animals. In light, if the ingredient in question is produced mainly with fine cosmetics, it could not be tested on animals. If on the other hand its utility first is to provide other industries (produced painting, for example), but that secondarily it can also be used in beauty care, then these tests will be unfortunately always authorized.

    The attentive consumer will have to thus continue to refer to the list of the cosmetic products not tested on animals if it wishes unquestionable being to buy ethical.

    In addition, the European Coalition to put an end to the animal experimentation, whose GAIA is member, continues to work to prevent, as soon as that is legally possible, the use of animals within the framework of directive REACH.

    Cordially,

    Vincent Bozzolan
    Face Desk Officer

    A REGULATION WHICH HIDING PLACE a MASSIVE INCREASE IN the TESTS ON ANIMALS
    by I boycott the products tested on the animals, Thursday January 31, 2013, 13:21 •
    Yesterday, 30 janiver 2013, I announced the application to you, from March 11, 2013, of the European regulation aiming at prohibiting the resale of products tested on the animals (product finished and ingredients) in Europe…

    It is more important than ever to buy ONLY certified marks not tested on the animals!

    Extract of an article concerning this reglementation…
    a regulation which does not have a direction taking into account new program REACH!
    I quote:
    “The prohibition of the tests on the animals for the cosmetic ingredients hiding places a massive increase in the tests on the animals in Europe.

    On January 15, 2003, the European Directive on the cosmetics was modified with an aim of prohibiting the tests on the animals for the cosmetic ingredients. For the companies, groups of action and individuals who had fought against the tests on the animals, it was a significant victory, celebrated like such.
    This prohibition was made possible because the European public was sensitized with the contents of the tests endured by the animals for their make-up and their products of hygiene, and they are these consumers who required that the animals not suffer and do not die for them. It from now on is regarded as asset that the tests on the animals for the cosmetic products belong to the past, that no company lends itself to it more and that they are prohibited in fact.

    That would be largely true if there were not a new European legislative device called REACH (recording, evaluation and authorization of chemical substances). The goals of REACH are creditable: to make sure that the chemicals are regulated better so that those which are dangerous for our health or the environment are restricted in their use. Nevertheless, the safety of the chemicals will be given starting from data collected on the animals, and if a chemical tested forever on the animals, then of such tests will have to be carried out.

    The large majority of the 8000 and some ingredients used by the manufacturers of cosmetics thus will be concerned with REACH. Concretely, it is the case of any ingredient having undergone the least “chemical treatment” and one currently finds 143000 substances on the list. For example, the lavender is exempted of test but not the essential oil of lavender. And these are precisely the most natural ingredients, generally those that prefer to use the companies opposed to the tests on the animals, which are most likely to be tested on the animals now whereas they were not it before.
    The tests on the animals are a not very reliable indicator in the way in which a substance will react on the human body or the environment. Indeed, very often the lawful authorities which compile data collected on the animals show the absence from certainty as for the results obtained for a studied substance, and require so that other tests on animals be led to decide. We fear that that is the case with REACH; not only that will mark the end of all the cosmetics without cruelty and the end of the free choice of the consumers who prefer these products, but moreover, these tests being inappropriate, that will not result in putting on the market of the surer products nor to the prohibition of the dangerous substances. ”

    Source of the article: http://fr.lush.eu/shop/info/9/animal-testing

  • karen commented on February 11, 2013 at 9:35 am

    want to say this is great news n tears on my eyes,, animals dont deserve it at all..

  • antonella commented on February 12, 2013 at 9:01 pm

    grazie con cuore per quello che fatte

  • Susan Deacon commented on February 14, 2013 at 10:02 pm

    On the surface this looks great news. However with reference to the detailed comment posted regarding the REACH policy, it looks like it will be impossible to buy any products with ingredients not tested on animals in the future and cruelty free products will no longer exist.

  • Esther commented on February 15, 2013 at 10:25 pm

    Thank you for your effort 😉 xxx

  • Jackie McKay commented on February 18, 2013 at 10:52 pm

    For years, I have been hoping this mindless and pointless cruelty to animals would end and I really hope that the cruelty free ban on all animals will go ahead and stop cosmetic companies testing their products on animals of any kind. Thanks PETA.

  • joanna commented on February 23, 2013 at 2:35 am

    I am very happy about that and do hope it won’t be just a matter of having it written neatly on the paper. Also, I do hope that European consumers’ voice will make the producers rethink the whole China market thing. I know life is all about maknig the money nowadays but we are a serious target group as well, and some clear rules should be established. Cruelty is a bad idea and we just don’t want to buy it anymore. And seriously, if it all goes in the same direction, I woll soonend up without any cosmetics to choose from :).

  • joanna commented on February 23, 2013 at 2:45 am

    I also hope that one day Europe will stop being so obedient to China just for the sake of money and will actually start defending the ideas in which we allegedly believe…

  • Jane Moore commented on February 23, 2013 at 5:41 pm

    That is fantastic news; animal testing for beauty is utterly unjustifiable, well done.

  • Laura commented on February 23, 2013 at 5:48 pm

    So what’s going to happen exactly? What can we expect?

    I’ve spoken to a few large shops (e.g. supermarkets) who have replied to me saying they are not aware of this ban and as far as they know the products (from L’oreal, Max Factor, etc) will remain on the shelves.

    Unless these companies are simply going to send us any cosmetic products which haven’t been tested to fill the shelves, surely this ban means they can no longer sell their products in our country? But if that was the case, surely a very large proportion of the products on the shop shelves will need to be removed as of March 11th with this ban being enforced.

    However if the large shop giants aren’t even aware of the ban then how is this going to affect what we see for sale?

    I want to see an end to animal testing for cosmetics as I believe it’s barbaric and unnecessary. I think the UK’s been quite hypocritical banning the animal testing for UK companies yet allows other countries who do test sell their products here.

    I want to see all of these completely removed and no longer on sale. But will it happen?? What will this ban actually do? And why don’t the large supermarkets know about it?

    • Ella commented on February 28, 2013 at 9:57 pm

      No you don’t get it, i doesn’t mean that products that have been tested allready will be removed it means that no products tested after that date will be legal to sell in Europe. It would be impossible to ban all products that have been tested, since nearly every ingrediant we use today in cosmetics has been tested at some point in the past even if the cruelty free companies who use them no longer do so. Banning those products would be pointless, the damage is allready done, the goal to fight for is to stop futher suffering.

  • Kim Anderson commented on February 24, 2013 at 9:02 am

    Excellent. This is wonderful news and a definite breakthrough in this wonderful work. Thank you to all involved.

  • Leena Parkar commented on February 24, 2013 at 3:00 pm

    Yes sooo happy for the animals!

  • laura commented on February 25, 2013 at 2:38 pm

    stop animal cruelty!!

  • Val Kerry commented on February 25, 2013 at 3:16 pm

    GRAET NEWS !!!! LETS HOPE WE CAN NOW HELP THE ANIMALS IN OTHER WAYS SUCH AS HOUSEHOLD CLEANING PRODUCT !!!!!
    AFTER ALL THEIR ARE NOW OTHER WAYS TO TEST THEM WITHOUT POISENING ANIMALS . IF OTHERS CAN DO IT WHY NOT PROCTER & GAMBLE AND OTHER COMPANYS STILL KILLING ANIMALS
    ALSO HOPE THEY DONT BRING IN COSMETICS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES THAT HAVE BEEN TEST ON.

  • Nicoletta commented on February 25, 2013 at 5:37 pm

    It is stupid to test any animal product. The need to stop abusing living beings for their lucrative purposes. You seek human volunteers aware on what do tests. Nicole Diso Italy

  • Lorenzo Esposito commented on February 28, 2013 at 7:05 pm

    Basta con la violenza sugli animali !!!!

  • Alessandra Bocci commented on March 1, 2013 at 4:36 pm

    Basta con la crudeltà sugli animali!!!!!

  • monica benato commented on March 2, 2013 at 9:26 am

    stop alla vivisezione!!!!!

  • Filippo commented on March 4, 2013 at 7:32 pm

    STOP ALLA VIVISEZIONE SUGLI ANIMALI! E’ DISUMANO!

  • POLA DANIELA commented on March 6, 2013 at 3:04 pm

    NO VIVISECTION

  • Joanna commented on March 9, 2013 at 11:26 am

    This is brilliant news and makes me very happy. I am smiling on the inside and out through this amazing act of compassion.

    My heart feels a bit better in knowing some of the suffering will end. There is still a long way to go but it is a good start.

    I truly hope that this positive progress continues! :-)

  • Mica commented on March 10, 2013 at 7:15 pm

    Have just seen the coverage and news about the “Savetheharlanbeagles” it is a disgrace and inhumane. Have been going round the house looking for products tested on animals and chucking them in the bin.Have been buying Ecover and I think it is a great product sensitive and not too powerful very delicate, washing smells fresh and delicate and love the washing up and cleaning stuff. Now for my levothyroxine as I have a thyroid problem. The Almus Pharmaceuticals is on the box and will send them an email and do some research. Should the product have been tested on animals I will simply stop taking them. I beleve strongly in animal welfare and that no animal should suffer for beauty or medicine. Having seen what happens to the beagles in a lab makes me feel sick, the yelping and screaming of a dog, I could not eat and went to bed crying.This is what it is doing to the majority of us and up until now one turns a blind eye and think its not happening and until you hear news that beagles arrived in Manchester to go to a lab.I believe no animals should suffer and will refuse to take my thyroid tablets if they are/have been and look for a company who dont test, I doubt there is one that dont test for medicine.

    • Lyndsay Ramsey commented on May 19, 2013 at 7:17 pm

      Hi Mica, I don’t for one minute want to be negative, but you may want to know something I have just read, which is that Ecover tests on water fleas, so are not actually cruelty free. They seem to mainly focus on ‘Eco friendly’ as in earth/environmental friendly, rather than to include animals in this description.
      Regards,
      Lyndsay

  • Leon commented on March 19, 2013 at 9:28 pm

    Can anyone answer my question? If china test cosmetics on animals for sale in china do they also test cosmetics that are destined for other countries but not for sale in china?

    • Dan commented on March 20, 2013 at 5:11 pm

      My understanding is that those cosmetics receiving new tests in China will not be allowed to be sold in the EU.

  • Leon commented on March 20, 2013 at 7:46 pm

    Thanks dan. I sell kids face paints and cosmetics to colleges from a EU manufacture

    And sick of the cheap, bad quality cosmetics being sold to colleges or fancy dress shops!

  • Arthur Gene Sumner commented on March 22, 2013 at 11:15 pm

    Animals have basic rights,which human beings must respect.All experiments on animals are completely wrong,and violates universal law.
    In many ways animals have far superior spiritual qualities than human beings.

  • Lucinda commented on March 24, 2013 at 6:51 pm

    So glad this ban has come out me and all my friends at collage are very happy with this and we will be very anger if the ban is lifted, very anger!!

  • Pat Homer. commented on March 26, 2013 at 5:35 pm

    Am I glad!!!!!!! I use Faith In Nature and other similar products. Does this also cover cleaning materials , I think not but would hope that this can be stopped too. We have to speak for these animals, they can’t speak for themselves.

  • Muriel Servaege commented on April 2, 2013 at 8:51 pm

    I’m really happy about that. It’s a real breakthrough and I hope things will go on in the same way.

  • julia commented on April 6, 2013 at 6:02 pm

    Any ban on animal suffering is good, and it should be made clear that China must stop abusing animals! I, for one cannot bear hearing about the suffering of Beagles in labs, or any animal. It kills me inside.
    I hope this ban has taken effect now, and that others will follow. It is unbearable to think that animals suffer inhumanely. It is beyond me how any human can work in labs and do this. They must be made of steel.

    Please stop all animal experiments, and all unecessary cruelty. Thanks

    • Helyne Hesford commented on April 9, 2013 at 8:04 pm

      If experiments are necessary, why can’t it be done on humans I have heard of some humans signing up for drug testing, they get paid. What do animals get, suffering.

  • Katie R commented on April 8, 2013 at 6:34 pm

    The ban on testing is a huge milestone and a great achievement.

    Next, we must stop China abusing animals.. Beating millions of dogs to death. Such horrible, needless suffering of an animal. Please, please can something be done!? All animals are sentient beings, with feelings and emotions like us. We are not above them. All animal cruelty, testing should be banned.

    • Michele Waterman commented on April 16, 2013 at 5:49 pm

      Absolutely Katie! I have written letters and signed loads of petitions over the years and still it continues!

  • Anne commented on April 12, 2013 at 3:51 pm

    Great news re cosmetics and I fully agree that we should now look to ban testing on household products too. Regarding China, I reckon we should all stop buying anything Chinese (and I mean anything including Chinese Takeaway food, Chinese cars and Chinese rubbish on internet sites such as ebay) until China signs up to and respects laws protecting animals and stops all animal testing. Encouraging contacts to do the same on Facebook and Twitter and a petition to whoever can do something in China would probably be quite powerful too. If all of us animal lovers in Europe and USA pledge not to buy anything Chinese we should be quite a large voice. One more thing, I believe I read in Peta that Avon now sell their cosmetics to China and China demands all cosmetics they sell are tested on animals. I’ve stopped buying Avon and written to them telling them why. So far no reply which, to me, says they are guilty!

  • Michele Waterman commented on April 16, 2013 at 5:46 pm

    A BAN ON ANIMAL TESTING HAS NOT COME A MOMENT TOO SOON! WHILE THE EAST SUPPLIES “CHEAPER” GOODS…IT IS THE WEST WHO BUYS IT!
    HORRENDOUS CRUELTY THAT MOST CHOOSE TO TURN THEIR BACKS ON AND KEEP SILENT ABOUT IT.
    I HAVE HAD CREAMS TESTED ON MYSELF – WHAT A FAR MORE ACCURATE AND BENEFICIAL WAY!
    IT IS THE 21ST CENTURY AND SO MANY HAVE NOT EVOLVED – BARBARIC – BECAUSE THOSE MEETING OUT THE TORTURE ARE NOT THE ONES WHO ARE SUFFERING!!!

  • Barbara Nilo commented on April 19, 2013 at 1:21 am

    Yesssss i’m very happy for animals……..i have a very nice bunny fanny clever and much more……

  • emma commented on April 21, 2013 at 6:35 pm

    hi, pleae dont think im stupid, just wanted to be clear on this new ban. Does this mean that any cosmetics sold in the uk are no longe tested on animals?

  • Aubrey commented on May 1, 2013 at 11:59 pm

    Today, I went to the beach with my children. I found a sea shell and
    gave it to my 4 year old daughter and said “You can hear the ocean if you put this to your ear.” She put the shell to her ear and screamed.
    There was a hermit crab inside and it pinched her ear.
    She never wants to go back! LoL I know this is completely off topic
    but I had to tell someone!

  • Carol Edwards commented on June 1, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    I hate animal testing for anything. Creatures have a right to live their natural lives just the way humans do. Maybe I’m ignorant, but haven’t we got enough products on the market with already tested ingredients without putting these poor little souls through more torture. These people who work in testing laboratories must be psychopaths to want to hear a creature cry out in pain, and inflict further suffering on them. Not mentally stable if you ask me.

  • Louise commented on July 23, 2013 at 12:33 pm

    I don’t really understand this. I’m from Denmark and all over the shops are makeup, that is still being tested on animals. Like MAC, L’oreal and others. So what does this mean? Why haven’t this been removed from the shelfs yet? I am very confused. Could someone clarify this for me??

  • paul commented on November 26, 2013 at 7:27 pm

    It’s a great shame that the humans make these cruel experiments against dogs , cats and against all animals . The animals haven’t here on earth to be treated in a shameous way so, they’re here to be treated with respect too them, they have their rights, like humans. They have all rights to love on these earth , and to live well, with the more greatest respect : many thousands years ago the cats in Egypt were respected in a great way by the humans , what’s happened to some humans to treat the animals with this cruelty , it’s the time to stop these cruel experiments !!!!!!!!!!

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