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Hopping-Mad 'Rabbits' Descend On Oxford Street To Blast Angora Fur Trade

For Immediate Release:
19 December 2013

Contact:

Ben Williamson +44 (0) 20 7837 6327, ext 229; BenW@peta.org.uk

Photos are available here, here and here. More are available on request.

London – Giant "rabbits" converged on London's West End on Thursday morning to ask Christmas shoppers not to buy angora wool.

The action comes on the heels of the group's release of video footage from PETA Asia's undercover investigation of angora rabbit farms in China, the source of 90 per cent of the world's angora. The video reveals workers violently ripping the fur out of rabbits' skin as the animals scream in pain. After they endure this torment every three months for two to five years, their throats are slit and the skin is ripped from their bodies.

"PETA is appealing to shoppers this holiday season", says PETA's Kirsty Henderson. "Please take the time to read the label on that sweater or scarf. If it says 'angora', remember the gentle rabbits whose fur was cruelly ripped out of their skin – and leave the item on the shelf."

"Watching PETA's exposé of angora farms in China sickened me", added celebrity vet Emma Milne. "Rabbits are social prey animals with complex welfare needs and it's clear from this film that their mental and physical wellbeing is being totally and utterly disregarded. Quite simply this practice must be stopped and I would urge everyone to boycott angora products until that time comes."

Following an overnight development, PETA welcomes Gap Inc.'s suspension of angora with the caveat it will lead to a ban so that rabbits and consumers can breathe easy again. Consumers can send a clear message to any retailers still selling angora items by shopping elsewhere and by choosing from the multitude of warm, high-quality, animal-free clothing and accessories available.

Broadcast-quality video footage is available here. Photos from the investigation are available on request.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk.

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