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Alan Carr Wants You to Be a 'Fairy' for Animals – And Always Spay or Neuter

For Immediate Release:

15 April 2014

Contact:

Hannah Levitt +44 (0) 20 7837 6327, ext 235; HannahL@peta.org.uk

Britain's 'Chatty Man' Stars in New PETA Advert Urging Fans to Help 'Fix' the Dog and Cat Overpopulation Crisis

London – Wearing a pair of pink fairy wings and brandishing a star-shaped magic wand, Chatty Man host Alan Carr stars in a cheeky new PETA campaign that proclaims, "Be a Little Fairy for Animals!" The new advert, available here, goes on to explain that the homeless-animal overpopulation problem is at a crisis point – and that the best way to save animals' lives is by always spaying and neutering. 

"There's no magic wand that will find homes for all of Britain's homeless dogs and cats, but simple procedures – spaying and neutering – will make a huge difference in the long run", says Carr. "We can work towards fixing the dog and cat overpopulation problem just by getting our animals 'fixed'!"

Why are Carr and PETA so keen on getting animals "fixed"? One unspayed female cat and her kittens can produce 370,000 cats in just seven years, and an unneutered male can help create limitless litters of kittens. Every year in the UK, many thousands of animals are left at animal shelters, where many have to be euthanised because there simply aren't enough good homes for them. Other animals are abandoned on the streets, where they starve to death, get injured or killed by vehicles or fall prey to abuse. 

Spaying and neutering "fixes" the overpopulation crisis at the source, and it makes animals less likely to develop cancer of the reproductive system, get into fights and become infected with deadly, contagious diseases such as feline leukaemia and feline AIDS.

Carr joins a growing list of celebrities – including Morrissey, Simon Cowell, Jane Lynch, Bill Maher, Cloris Leachman, Marc Maron, Charlize Theron, Naughty Boy and Mickey Rourke – who have teamed up with PETA or its overseas affiliates to promote spaying and neutering.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk.

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