Farfetch Is Now Fur-Free – but What About Angora?

Thanks to pressure from PETA and our affiliates – and after receiving over 100,000 appeals from people around the world – Farfetch banned the sale of fur from its online luxury platform. It’s great progress, but the website still contains hundreds of items made of the hair of live-plucked, tormented rabbits who are kept inside small, filthy, barren cages and face the ordeal of being plucked up to four times a year.

No matter where it’s sourced from, there’s no such thing as humane angora. PETA Asia’s exposé of Chinese fur farms reveals the horrifying screams of the rabbits as they’re being plucked, a process they’ll endure repeatedly for two to three years before they’re ultimately killed.

An investigation by OneVoice into French angora farms revealed that rabbits were tied to tables while their fur was torn off. Workers also twisted and pulled the animals into unnatural positions in order to pluck their hair, often with the skin still attached, from all over their bodies, including their genitals.

Farfetch is well aware that the ways in which angora is obtained from rabbits are every bit as abhorrent as the production of fur. As more and more brands, including Gucci and Burberry, ditch real fur and angora in favour of materials that are kinder to animals and the environment, there’s simply no excuse for Farfetch to continue to allow unscrupulous designers to peddle cruelty on its website.

How You Can Help

Speak out and urge Farfetch to go angora-free in one or more of the following ways:

Comment on Social Media Send an E-Mail Ask Your Friends to Join You

Comment on Social Media

Help flood Farfetch’s social media accounts with polite messages urging it to drop angora:

Tweet at Farfetch Comment on Facebook Comment on Instagram

 

Need some inspiration? Here are some sample posts:

  • Twitter: Hey, @farfetch! Please pledge to ban angora sales on your website. No matter where it’s sourced, there’s no such thing as humane angora. Spare rabbits the pain of being twisted into unnatural positions while workers pull the hair from their skin. #FarfetchGoAngoraFree
  • Facebook and Instagram: Please pledge to ban angora sales on your website. No matter where it’s sourced, there’s no such thing as humane angora. Introduce a ban and spare rabbits the pain of being twisted into unnatural positions while workers pull the hair from their skin. #FarfetchGoAngoraFree

Send an E-Mail

Use the “Contact Us” form on Farfetch’s website to send an e-mail politely letting its staff know how disappointed you are about the continued sale of angora online and in its stores:

E-Mail Farfetch

Need some inspiration? Here’s a sample post:

  • FAO: Jose NevesDear Mr Neves:I’m writing to urge you to ban the sale of angora items on Farfetch’s platform.

    Major designers and retailers – including fashion icons Gucci and Burberry – have banned angora, yet Farfetch continues to allow designers to peddle the hair of tortured rabbits on its website.

    Angora rabbits are typically kept inside small, filthy, barren cages and face the ordeal of live-plucking up to four times a year. During this process, they’re physically restrained as workers tear the hair from their sensitive bodies, leaving only the fur on their heads. A PETA exposé of Chinese angora farms revealed the horrifying screams of the rabbits who were being plucked, a process they endure repeatedly for two to three years before they’re ultimately killed.

    Another investigation by OneVoice into French angora farms also revealed the disturbing truth about this industry. The group’s footage shows that rabbits were tied to tables while their hair was torn from their skin. Workers also twisted and pulled the animals into unnatural positions in order to pluck the hair, often with the skin still attached, from all over their bodies, including their genitals.

    Whilst the vast majority of angora originates in China, exposés of so-called “high-welfare” farms here in Europe have found similar conditions. No matter where it’s sourced, there’s no such thing as humane angora.

    Please pledge to ban all angora sales on Farfetch’s website.

    Yours sincerely,


Ask Your Friends to Join You

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