VIDEO: The Ugly Beginnings of UGG Boots

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Stylish to some and uggly to others, UGG boots are certainly a divisive topic. But now this video – which reveals the barbaric treatment of sheep in the wool industry – is persuading more people to ditch them for good.

The Ugly Beginnings of UGG BootsSHARE for everyone who still wears UGGs.

Posted by PETA UK on Wednesday, 30 November 2016

 

UGGs are made from the wool and skins of sheep, who are sickeningly mistreated in the wool and meat industries. Farmworkers often hole-punch their ears, chop off their tails, and even castrate males, all without administering any pain relief. A PETA US investigation also found that workers stamped on their heads, jabbed them in the face with sharp metal clippers, and left huge gashes on their bodies that were later crudely sewn up with a needle and thread.

Knock-off imitations are no better, either. Tests conducted on some UGG-style boots labelled as “Australian sheepskin” revealed that they were actually made from raccoon dog fur, most likely from animals confined to cages on barbaric Chinese fur farms.

Feeling chilled to the bone? Don’t despair. There are so many stylish footwear options out there to protect your feet from the elements without harming animals. Check out these luxury boots from Pammies Life, PETA supporter Pamela Anderson’s animal- and environment-friendly collection. Or how about these beauties by Beyond Skin? If you’re looking for a bargain, this Esprit pair might be just the ticket. If in doubt, look for the “PETA-Approved Vegan” label.

Remember: every purchase of UGG boots and other wool products supports extreme animal abuse – but you can help prevent this suffering by steering clear of all animal-derived materials.

Help Prevent Cruelty

Share this post with your friends and family and let them know how easy it is to combine fashion with compassion.

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