Nurseries’ Glitter Ban Prompts Call to Ban Meat, Too

 

For Immediate Release:
22 November 2017

Contact:
Olivia Jordan +44 (0) 20 7837 6327, ext 229; [email protected]

NURSERIES’ GLITTER BAN PROMPTS CALL TO BAN MEAT, TOO

PETA Encourages Bournemouth-Based Tops Day Nurseries to Switch to Eco-Friendly Vegan Menu

Bournemouth – After Tops Day Nurseries banned glitter because of its environmental impact, PETA sent the nursery chain a letter this morning asking it to make a change that would have a far bigger impact – switching to a vegan menu.

In the letter, PETA points out that the United Nations has identified animal agriculture as “one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global” and has stated that a global shift towards vegan eating is necessary to save the world from the worst effects of climate change.

“When it comes to protecting the environment, what’s on the kitchen table is far more important than what’s on the craft table,” says PETA Director of Vegan Corporate Projects Dawn Carr. “Tops Day Nurseries has made a start by banning glitter, and PETA is calling for the chain to switch to an all-vegan menu that’s good for the planet, children, and animals.”

PETA – whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat” – notes that vegan meals are also a great way to meet kids’ nutritional needs. As childcare expert Dr Benjamin Spock wrote, “Children who grow up getting nutrition from plant foods rather than meats have a tremendous health advantage. They are less likely to develop weight problems, diabetes, high blood pressure, and some forms of cancer.”

In addition to being better for the environment and human health, vegan meals spare animals daily suffering and a terrifying death in today’s meat, egg, and dairy industries, in which calves are torn away from their mothers within hours or days of birth, piglets’ tails are cut off without any painkillers, and chickens’ throats are slit while they’re still conscious.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk.

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