Mango Bans Fur And Exotic-Animal Skins Following Campaigns By PETA And Its Affiliates

For Immediate Release:
22 November 2011
Elisa Allen 020 7357 9229, ext 243; [email protected]
London – Leading international clothing and accessory retailer Mango has banned the use of exotic skins in its product lines after meeting with PETA’s affiliate, PETA US, and learning about the extreme animal suffering caused by the exotic-skins industry. The company has also announced that it will no longer sell fur items. Mango is based in Barcelona, Spain, and has a total of 2,060 stores in 104 countries worldwide, including 70 in the UK.
“Although we aren’t as familiar with minks, foxes, snakes and alligators as we are with the cats and dogs with whom we share our lives, these animals suffer every bit as much when beaten, skinned alive and killed”, says PETA Manager Mimi Bekhechi. “We’re asking retailers worldwide to follow Mango’s lead and allow fur and exotic skins to remain on their original owners – the animals.”
Each year, millions of minks, foxes, coyotes, rabbits and even dogs and cats are bludgeoned to death, electrocuted, strangled with wire nooses or skinned alive – all in the name of fashion. For every cuff, collar, piece of trim or coat made from real fur, an animal suffered a miserable life and an agonising death.

In Africa, Asia and the US, exotic animals – including snakes, lizards, alligators and crocodiles – are hunted or raised and killed specifically for their skins. Alligators and crocodiles killed for their skins are stabbed in the neck with a metal chisel or bludgeoned with metal bats. PETA Asia’s undercover investigations have shown that live snakes are nailed to trees by their heads before their skins are torn off their writhing bodies. They can suffer for hours before they die.
Mango joins H&M, Topshop and other companies in adopting animal welfare policies that ban exotic skins and fur following actions taken by PETA and its international affiliates.