‘MEAT Your Maker’: New Belfast Billboard Reveals Shocking Toll of Meat on Human Health

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In light of a new Harvard study that links unhealthy animal foods such as sausages, bacon, and eggs to higher mortality rates, PETA has decided to spread the word by putting up a giant billboard featuring a meat pie in the shape of a coffin. We’ve placed the striking advert in Belfast, where residents have one of the country’s lowest average life expectancies.

Meat Your Maker ED

The study, conducted by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, shows that eating foods rich in animal protein is associated with higher mortality. It also found that swapping processed red meat for plant protein, such as lentils, beans, and nuts, reduces the risk of early death by an astonishing 34 per cent. Researchers concluded that the healthiest source of protein is from plants and that plant-based foods are the best choice for long-term health benefits.

The study supports a recent World Health Organisation report which classified processed meat as carcinogenic to humans – right alongside smoking. Numerous other studies have found that vegans are also less prone to suffer from heart disease, obesity, and diabetes than meat-eaters are.

Vegans also have a lower carbon footprint, as the meat industry is a leading producer of the greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute to climate change. And of course, everyone who goes vegan spares many animals daily suffering and a terrifying death.

With increasingly available vegan options in restaurants and , going vegan is easier than ever before, and with so much to gain from eating healthy animal-free foods, it’s the best choice for your health and for animals as well as for the environment. Try the tasty recipes in our free vegan starter kit and discover how simple vegan eating can be:

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